The week in sport with Adrian Logan

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I am joined in the garden once again by Adrian Logan to discuss the world of sport.

On the agenda this week:

  • Why the Republic of Ireland would be better off without Giovanni Trapattoni.
  • Should Brendan Rodgers be fearful of Harry Redknapp?
  • Can Ulster win the Heineken Cup?
  • All-Ireland champions, Donegal face Tyrone in a difficult draw in Ulster.
  • Will Frankel run again?
  • Is Cristiano Ronaldo the next Frankel?
  • Rio Ferdinand and that t-shirt.

 

Brendan Rodgers faces Harry Redknapp. Image courtesy of Huw Evans Pictures Agency.

 

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About Author

I am a regular contributor to discussion programmes on TV and radio both at home and abroad. An experienced political editor and author specialising in Politics, Security and 20th Century Art.

2 Comments

  1. Stafford Reynolds on

    Eamonn, always good to have the views of Logie on what’s happening on the sports front. Would like to hear a wee bit, now and again, on the local domestic soccer game as it still retains an appeal to a significant number. It’s well known that the local game and facilities are probably 30+ years behind the game on the mainland but thats probably not unexpected after decades of social unrest. During those difficult years a big volunary effort was required to keep the show on the road. We lost Derry City, Distillery were forced to relocate, Cliftonville had to play their ‘home’ games with Linfield at Linfield’s stadium for 18 years….and there’s lots lots more that can be added. I have followed the local game for many years and while it has its detractors I can testify to a lot more engagement across and within communities than perhaps those other games that appear to attract a higher profile. Major efforts were made to keep the game alive for the game itself and the social engagement. There is now an indication that some funding will be made available to local soccer and other sports clubs (with Casement, Windsor and Ravenhill already allocated). While that is of course welcome I would suggest it is not only very little, very late, and a poor recognition of the social contribution of sport. Not the peace dividend I had anticipated in the new N Ireland

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